From today 11/2/16 through 11/17/16, MacPhun’s new Image Editor, Luminar is available for Pre-Order Pricing. Anyone looking for a powerful, intuitive alternative, or adjunct plugin for Photoshop might want to take a closer look at this app – it’s VERY powerful!

LUMINAR PRE-ORDER OFFER INFO
Offer available: November 2 – November 17

Pricing:
New Customer Pre-Order Price: $59 Includes Pre-Order Bonuses!
Current Users of any Macphun Software, including Aurora HDR Price: $49 Includes Pre-Order Bonuses

Luminar Key Features:
Adaptive User Interface
Multiple Modes: From basic to advanced
One-click switch between modes
Change modes anytime
All-in-one photo editing tool set
Includes essential editing tools for different photography styles
Live editing, live processing, live previews
Non-destructive editing
Works as a standalone app or plug-in
RAW converter & processor
History Panel

*For full list of Luminar features visit the https://macphun.com/luminar

From today 11/2/16 through 11/17/16, MacPhun’s new Image Editor, Luminar is available for Pre-Order Pricing. Anyone looking for a powerful, intuitive alternative, or adjunct plugin for Photoshop might want to take a closer look at this app – it’s VERY powerful!

LUMINAR PRE-ORDER OFFER INFO
Offer available: November 2 – November 17

Pricing:
New Customer Pre-Order Price: $59 Includes Pre-Order Bonuses!
Current Users of any Macphun Software, including Aurora HDR Price: $49 Includes Pre-Order Bonuses

Luminar Key Features:
Adaptive User Interface
Multiple Modes: From basic to advanced
One-click switch between modes
Change modes anytime
All-in-one photo editing tool set
Includes essential editing tools for different photography styles
Live editing, live processing, live previews
Non-destructive editing
Works as a standalone app or plug-in
RAW converter & processor
History Panel

*For full list of Luminar features visit the https://macphun.com/luminar

Techconnect.com has an article that lists all the various adapters necessary to use your peripherals (wired printers, external hard drives, monitors, iDevice connectors, etc.) with the new Thunderbolt 3 technology. Granted, Thunderbolt 3‘s power is amazing – can push up to 100W of power, the data transfer speed is 40Gbps, it can run two 4K monitors, and power tons of devices at once. But this power comes at a cost. Firstly – the only connective technology with which it’s directly compatible is USB-C. If you have ANY older devices, you’ll need to shell out more money for new adapters to suit your varying peripherals.

So, be ready – if you’re preparing to dish out between $2,400-$3400 on a new MacBook Pro – remember to build a few hundred more into your budget if you want to work with all your previous devices.

MacBook Pro Thunderbold 3 Adapter Guide (techconnect.com)

As you all know, I’m a big fan of using my DSLR for most of my photography, but it’s rather bulky to carry – so often, I count on my Smart Phone to capture a moment or scene (in my case, an iPhone 5S). I love it’s convenience, but compared to the captures I can get on my Nikon, there are often issues I have to repair.
Noise (blocks of off-color pixels) is a major issue for me. I get it in skies, shadows, areas that should be smooth look broken and pixellated. This is a particular problem in Southern California, where the lighting outside can often be quite harsh. Please note, this software is Mac only.
Enter MacPhun Noiseless (and Noiseless Pro, as a Photoshop Plugin). With some truly intuitive settings, noise can be easily cleared from an image, while clarity and detail can be maintained and enhanced. Check it out by clicking the banner:

Just a warning! People using the Transmission BitTorrent client software may have given hackers access to their computers. According to a MacWorld.com article, People who downloaded a new version of Transmission this past Sunday and Monday (August 28th and 19th, 2016) may have installed the affected software, capable of spreading malware through your system.

If you may be affected, please read the article at: http://bit.ly/2c2Akkc

One set of my favorite plugin developers, MacPhun, has released an article on their blog about the expected changes in the upcoming MacOS Sierra. While I’m usually quite hesitant to upgrade my OS (I don’t like buying software upgrades for my existing apps – and what happened with Mavericks and it’s lack of video codecs is inexcusable), some of the revelations about the new Mac native photography apps are intriguing.

I skipped Mountain Lion, I’ve skipped El Capitan – but I might consider Sierra (after a good, long, healthy wait to the .2 update version).

Check out their article at: MacPhun

It happened. My backup hard drive used for my daily backup died. It was one of those 4TB MyBooks, that is made up of a RAID of 2, 2TB disks. On that SAME day, I had to teach an online class, which often somehow screws up my Time Machine (which takes ages to fix, but is doable, and got done). BUT, I still felt my data was safe in the event of a serious problem because I’d just renewed my subscription (I’d gotten an initial free 3 month trial) for BackBlaze. I figured that having ALL my other work data on the cloud for only $50/year wasn’t a bad idea – and indeed it wasn’t!

BackBlaze doesn’t back up my operating system, applications or parts of my user folder, but I have several other terabytes of data that sits on my startup and other connected drives. I live in earthquake country and my office electrical is… let’s say… overloaded. I was given a gift of a new 4TB multi-interface replacement backup drive so I can have my local backup again (nice gift, right?)- AND I ALWAYS HAVE A SEPARATE LOCAL CLONED BACKUP OF MY STARTUP DRIVE – but for $50 I had peace of mind – and that’s a great thing!

Check them out at www.BackBlaze.com.

Those of you who follow my posts on my page, or on Facebook know I’ve been a HEAVY supporter of 1Password, recommending it to my clients and students on both the Mac and Windows Platforms.

Well, I’m requesting data from the company as regards their newest upgrade – and it’s possible that I may be writing back with some news that may cause me to retract my support. Please keep watch.

https://agilebits.com/onepassword

The Macworld Help Desk has a really helpful article about what to expect when upgrading to Mac OS 10.8 (currently 10.8.2) Mountain Lion. The article can be seen at http://bit.ly/10n5gNc

Personally, I haven’t performed this upgrade, but there’s really only one reason for this at this point. I HAVE upgraded to Lion (10.7) and do not particularly like it. It’s GREAT for new users, but for those of us who’ve been using the Mac for a long time, we have to jump through too many hoops to do anything with real control. This is the same issue with Mountain Lion, and from what I see, Mountain Lion has some improvements over Lion. So, you ask, WHY have I upgraded to Lion, and skipped Lion?

Well, I NEED my old applications that run in Rosetta. “But” (you say), “Lion doesn’t run Rosetta either, so how can this be a good reason?”

In my efforts to keep my old apps running, I found the ONE version of VMWare Fusion that allowed us to install Snow Leopard as a guest operating system so I can run my old Snow Leopard installation (my favorite OS so far, btw) in emulation – much the same way I run Windows. Now, I need you guys to know that installing Snow Leopard’s Client OS may be breaking the “letter of the law” unless you use the Server version.

The ONE version of VMWare Fusion that will allow the use of Snow Leopard’s Client (means end-user version) will stop working if I upgrade it, and the old version will not run on Mountain Lion – simple as that!

Oh, and I should tell you that I HAVE tried using the Server version of Snow Leopard in Parallels and VMWare. They work fine, but don’t have the same capabilities as they do when emulating Windows – they don’t allow copy/paste to work between environments, and they don’t allow drag and drop of files from the main environment to the virtualized one (a VERY helpful feature between Mac and Windows – non-existent in Mac to Mac emulation – can you believe it?!)

All this, so you can understand the implications of upgrading your Operating System on the Mac. It may not affect you as most of you have been using the Mac for a short enough time that you don’t have any older programs that require Rosetta. But if you do, you may wish to take heed.

It’s very rare to see Macs targeted for Malware and Cyber Attacks. In large part, it’s because the Mac OS is really quite a secure Operating System, based on UNIX and containing lots of built-in security controls. However, I believe another factor in it’s lack of focus by the “bad guys” was because it has always been a “smaller target” a less popular, less-used OS, because there’ve never been as many Macs out there as Windows computers.

This time, it’s not the OS that’s been targeted directly, but an addition to the OS, called Java. Java (developed by Sun Microsystems) is a programming language that’s used within operating systems to enable the development and implementation of many functions and applications that can work on both Windows and Mac systems (and others). It’s something we rarely see directly being used, but lots of interfaces interact with Java: in particular lots of web apps and games.

So, imagine my surprise when MacWorld released an article named “Apple confirms cyber attack, releases Java update and malware removal tool”. Don’t worry – there’s a fix already posted by Apple in their software update – but you should all know.

Read MacWorld’s article at: http://www.macworld.com/article/2028740/apple-confirms-cyber-attack-will-release-security-tool.html#tk.nl_macwk


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