Photoshelter has posted a link to a FREE PDF that will teach photographers the ins-and-outs of U.S. copyright law, the major trends we’re seeing today, and how to avoid infringement.

From this guide you’ll learn:

Your 6 exclusive rights under copyright law
Tips to register your work through the U.S. Copyright Office
The risks to weigh before posting your photos to social networks
And more

Check it out at http://bit.ly/109HGTt

 

As far as my business is concerned Adobe Instructor/Macintosh Consultant – Mommy and Daddy are fighting and Uncle Kevin is moving in with Daddy!

http://www.macworld.com/article/2031340/adobe-cto-kevin-lynch-resigns-to-work-at-apple.html?goback=%2Egde_65027_member_224574060

I’m a Software Instructor and Mac Consultant – not an iPhone expert, so I was pleased to find an answer to a question today.

I have a 16GB iPhone 4, which has quite a lot of apps, music, video, photos and books on it. So, I’d expect to have a lot of space used on my phone. However, even with all this stuff, I was losing storage space to a “little item” called “Other” in my iTunes view of my phone – I was losing 2.6GB of space!!

I knew I could restore from a backup, but I’d just spent quite a bit of time clearing some photos and didn’t really want to spend an hour restoring from backup.

Fortunately, I found a very simple solution that worked perfectly:

On the iPhone, Go To “Settings/General/Usage/Music and then swipe left to right over the “All Music” entry and select Delete, then re-boot the iPhone.” He stated, ” you think it would delete all your music, but id doesn’t” (sic)

This was listed at: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3418045?start=75&tstart=0

Research is my friend!

The Macworld Help Desk has a really helpful article about what to expect when upgrading to Mac OS 10.8 (currently 10.8.2) Mountain Lion. The article can be seen at http://bit.ly/10n5gNc

Personally, I haven’t performed this upgrade, but there’s really only one reason for this at this point. I HAVE upgraded to Lion (10.7) and do not particularly like it. It’s GREAT for new users, but for those of us who’ve been using the Mac for a long time, we have to jump through too many hoops to do anything with real control. This is the same issue with Mountain Lion, and from what I see, Mountain Lion has some improvements over Lion. So, you ask, WHY have I upgraded to Lion, and skipped Lion?

Well, I NEED my old applications that run in Rosetta. “But” (you say), “Lion doesn’t run Rosetta either, so how can this be a good reason?”

In my efforts to keep my old apps running, I found the ONE version of VMWare Fusion that allowed us to install Snow Leopard as a guest operating system so I can run my old Snow Leopard installation (my favorite OS so far, btw) in emulation – much the same way I run Windows. Now, I need you guys to know that installing Snow Leopard’s Client OS may be breaking the “letter of the law” unless you use the Server version.

The ONE version of VMWare Fusion that will allow the use of Snow Leopard’s Client (means end-user version) will stop working if I upgrade it, and the old version will not run on Mountain Lion – simple as that!

Oh, and I should tell you that I HAVE tried using the Server version of Snow Leopard in Parallels and VMWare. They work fine, but don’t have the same capabilities as they do when emulating Windows – they don’t allow copy/paste to work between environments, and they don’t allow drag and drop of files from the main environment to the virtualized one (a VERY helpful feature between Mac and Windows – non-existent in Mac to Mac emulation – can you believe it?!)

All this, so you can understand the implications of upgrading your Operating System on the Mac. It may not affect you as most of you have been using the Mac for a short enough time that you don’t have any older programs that require Rosetta. But if you do, you may wish to take heed.


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